Document Type

Journal Article

Department/Unit

Department of Communication Studies

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the cultivation effects of television advertising viewing on the perceived affluence in society and the materialistic value orientations among adolescents in urban and rural China. Design/methodology/approach – The paper shows that a survey of 646 adolescents aged 11 to 17, in Guangzhou City, and in a rural county of Henan Province, was conducted in 2006. Constructs were measured using established scales. Findings – Television advertising viewing demonstrated first- and second-order cultivation effects among urban as well as rural respondents. Heavy television advertising viewers were more likely to have a higher perceived affluence than light television advertising viewers. Heavy television advertising viewers were also more materialistic than light television advertising viewers. When television-advertising viewing was controlled, urban respondents had a higher perceived affluence, while rural respondents had a higher level of materialism. Research limitations/implications – Students in grades 7 and 8 were examined only. A convenient sampling method was adopted. The city selected for the study is highly advanced in terms of economical and advertising development compared with most other Chinese cities. Practical implications – Rural adolescents did not hold strong beliefs about prevalence of affluence in society. Popularity appeal may not be a fruitful marketing communication strategy for durable goods for them. Different marketing communication strategies should be adopted for the urban and rural adolescents as target audience. Originality/value – The paper is a pioneer work on the study of consumption values of adolescents in urban and rural China.

Publication Year

2009

Journal Title

Young Consumers

Volume number

10

Issue number

2

Publisher

Emerald

First Page (page number)

133

Last Page (page number)

145

Referreed

1

DOI

10.1108/17473610910964714

ISSN (print)

17473616

Link to Publisher’s Edition

http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/17473610910964714

Keywords

China, Consumer psychology, Surveys, Youth

Included in

Communication Commons

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