Document Type

Journal Article

Department/ Unit

Department of English Language and Literature

Abstract

Since the early 1980s, when China began to witness an influx of foreign, mainly Western, translation theories as a result of its opening up to the outside world, a number of Chinese scholars have argued that the importation of these theories has been excessive, that the Chinese have always had their own tradition of studying translation, and that this tradition must be preserved and protected from too much outside influence. The author accepts that a Chinese tradition of theorizing translation does exist and attempts to outline the main features of this tradition. He argues, however, that the ‘Chineseness’ of Chinese translation theory is not something to be deliberately designed and manufactured but something that naturally forms and develops within the Chinese tradition, that Chinese scholarship, like all scholarship, can only benefit from interacting with other traditions, and, furthermore, that Sinocentrism can be as damaging to the development of translation studies as Eurocentrism.

Publication Year

2009

Journal Title

Translator: Studies in Intercultural Communication

Volume number

15

Issue number

2

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

First Page (page number)

283

Last Page (page number)

304

Referreed

1

DOI

10.1080/13556509.2009.10799282

ISSN (print)

1355-6509

Keywords

Chinese translation theory, tradition, Chineseness, non-Chineseness, dialectic, ethnoconvergence

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