http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-6486.2010.00937.x">
 

Document Type

Journal Article

Department/Unit

Department of Management

Title

Appraising performance across borders: an empirical examination of the purposes and practices of performance appraisal in a multi-country context

Language

English

Abstract

This study empirically investigated culture's consequences on the major purposes and practices of performance appraisal using a sample (n = 1749) drawn from the banking industry in seven countries across Europe, Asia, and North America. We found that the effects and predictive capability of assertiveness, uncertainty avoidance, in-group collectivism, and power distance should not be overstated nor are they straightforward. Organizations must be cognizant of the potential influence that a range of other organizational, institutional, and economic factors may wield on appraisal. These findings hold significant implications for the theoretical underpinnings of appraisal, a management tool largely rooted in US equity, expectancy, and procedural justice values and traditions. They also offer important lessons for practice. Not only is the transferability of appraisal and its operationalization affected by interactions with divergent cultures and contextual settings, but new hybrid appraisal architectures are emerging that necessitate further research. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Society for the Advancement of Management Studies.

Publication Date

2010

Source Publication Title

Journal of Management Studies

Volume

47

Issue

7

Start Page

1365

End Page

1393

Publisher

Wiley

ISSN (print)

00222380

ISSN (electronic)

14676486

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS