Document Type

Journal Article

Department/Unit

Department of History

Language

English

Abstract

This essay aims to elucidate the collaborative dimension of the knowledge-making process in eighteenth-century Linnaean botany. Due to its ever increasing and potentially infinite need for information, Linnaean botany had to rely more and more heavily on the accumulation and aggregation of contributions by many people. This, in turn, had a crucial impact on the genesis and form of botanical publications: the more comprehensive the project, the larger the effect. It was the botanist Carl Linnaeus who managed to establish himself as the centre of this contributory knowledge-making process. Given the exponential growth in the number of known species and the resulting need for observation, this was the necessary condition which allowed him continuously to update and correct his systematic works, and allowed them to maintain their status as the central catalogues of a global botany for decades. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

Publication Date

10-2012

Source Publication Title

Annals of Science

Volume

69

Issue

4

Start Page

551

End Page

569

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Peer Reviewed

1

Copyright

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Annals of Science in October 2012, available online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00033790.2012.680982.

DOI

10.1080/00033790.2012.680982

ISSN (print)

00033790

ISSN (electronic)

1464505X

Included in

History Commons

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