Document Type

Journal Article

Department/Unit

Department of Education Studies

Language

English

Abstract

Two sets of experiments were conducted to investigate the role of morphemes in word recognition and production. These experiments employed three priming procedures (i.e., masked, unmasked and long lag) to study the relatively early to late stages of morphological processing. Targets were Chinese compound words containing an ambiguous morpheme (analogous to ‘‘chair’’ in ‘‘chairman’’ vs. ‘‘armchair’’). Primes and targets shared the same ambiguous morpheme with the same interpretation (S), a different interpretation (D) or were completely unrelated (U). For word recognition, the facilitation by the S and the D primes was statistically identical in the masked priming procedure. But only the S primes continued to facilitate word recognition in the unmasked and the long-lag priming procedures. In contrast, for word production, only the D primes produced significant facilitation in masked priming. In unmasked priming, both the S and D primes facilitated the naming reaction times, as compared with the unrelated baseline. But the facilitation was stronger in the S than in the D conditions. Finally, in the long-lag priming procedure, both the S and the D primes produced facilitation of equal strength. These results indicate that the processing of ambiguous morpheme involves both morphemic form and meaning, and that the temporal dynamics of the two effects differ in recognition and production.

Keywords

Chinese, Morphological processing, Word production, Word recognition

Publication Date

5-2014

Source Publication Title

Language Cognition and Neuroscience

Volume

29

Issue

5

Start Page

543

End Page

560

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Peer Reviewed

1

Copyright

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Language Cognition and Neuroscience in May 2014, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/01690965.2013.790554.

Funder

The research was supported by the research grant 2021016 from The Chinese University of Hong Kong and the Start-up Grant 38-40-090 from Hong Kong Baptist University.

DOI

10.1080/01690965.2013.790554

ISSN (print)

23273798

ISSN (electronic)

23273801

Included in

Education Commons

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