http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phq030">
 

Document Type

Journal Article

Department/Unit

Department of Religion and Philosophy

Title

Community, the common good, and public healthcare—Confucianism and its relevance to contemporary China

Language

English

Abstract

Traditional Chinese culture, Confucianism, in particular, has a non-individualist conception of what it is to be human. It conceives of people fundamentally as members of social groups-specifically, the family, the clan, the political community and the state-not as atomic individuals as perceived in modern society. The communist ideology since the middle of the last century also emphasizes the significance of 'the common good' of the state which describes a specific 'good' that is shared and beneficial for all (or most) members of a given community. Nevertheless, marketization and decentralization in China today have significantly challenged the notion of a state-oriented community that directly impacts China's healthcare system, beginning with the dismantling of the rural collectives and state-owned enterprises as part of the reform and opening process. This article will address healthcare challenges in China today, examining the conceptual/ethical issues raised by public healthcare, and contending that public health concerns should go beyond the dichotomy between individualism and collectivism. The article will argue that the family-oriented model of Confucianism offers an alternative way to look at what constitute a community and common goods. The Confucian approach to ethics is relevant to healthcare today. For example, it will be much easier to find a shared idea of common good in terms of complicated issues like healthcare; it would make sense to give a larger role to families via family savings accounts, and not have everything determined by the government. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press.

Publication Date

2010

Source Publication Title

Public Health Ethics

Volume

3

Issue

3

Start Page

259

End Page

266

Publisher

Oxford University Press

ISSN (print)

17549973

ISSN (electronic)

17549981

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