Document Type

Journal Article

Department/Unit

Department of History

Language

English

Abstract

In this essay, translations of Linnaeus’ Systema naturae into various European languages will be placed into the context of successively expanded editions of Linnaeus’ writings. The ambition and intention of most translators was not only to make the Systema naturae accessible for practical botanical use by a wider readership, but also to supplement and correct it, and thus to shape it. By recruiting more users, translations made a significant contribution to keeping the Systema up to date and thus maintaining its practical value for decades. The need to incorporate countless additions and corrections into an existing text, to document their provenance, to identify inconsistencies, and to refer to relevant observations, descriptions, and illustrations in the botanical literature all helped to develop and refine techniques of textual montage. This form of textual engineering, becoming increasingly complex with each translation cycle, shaped the external appearance of new editions of the Systema, and reflected the modular architecture of a botanical system designed for expansion.

Publication Date

2014

Source Publication Title

Annals of Science

Volume

73

Issue

2

Start Page

143

End Page

156

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Peer Reviewed

1

Copyright

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Annals of Science in April 2014, available online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00033790.2014.929742.

Funder

This work was supported by the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region [grant number 253512].

DOI

10.1080/00033790.2014.929742

ISSN (print)

00033790

ISSN (electronic)

1464505X

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