Document Type

Journal Article

Department/Unit

Department of Communication Studies

Language

English

Abstract

HIV-related stigma in the wider community compounds the suffering of people living with HIV (PLWH) and hampers effective HIV prevention and care. This study examines the level of public stigma toward PLWH in Hong Kong and associated social-cultural factors. A telephone survey was conducted in June–July 2016 with 1080 Chinese adults aged 18–94 randomly selected from the general population. The results indicate substantial degree of public stigma toward PLWH. Overall, 58.1% of the participants endorsed at least one statement indicating negative social judgment of PLWH. Over 40% attributed HIV infections to irresponsible behaviors and nearly 30% perceived most PLWH as promiscuous. About 20% considered HIV to be a punishment for bad behavior and believed that PLWH should feel ashamed of themselves. These statistics indicate that HIV-related stigma among the general Hong Kong population had no noticeable reduction in a decade but is lower than that among rural and urban populations in China. Our findings suggest that the lower stigma in Hong Kong may be linked to higher education levels rather than Hongkongers’ more Westernized outlook. The results of a multiple regression analysis showed that education level (β = −.19), homophobia (β = .30), and conformity to norms (β = .14) were independent predictors of HIV-related stigma but not age, income, or cultural orientations. By differentiating between associated social-cultural factors, this study provides a more nuanced understanding of the layered nature of HIV-related stigma: not broadly grounded in religion or Chinese culture but stemming from more specific social-cultural beliefs – perceptions of norm violation and negative attitudes toward homosexuality, which were not mutually exclusive. These findings have implications for HIV-related stigma reduction by providing evidence for the importance of addressing homophobia. Existing HIV publicity activities should be re-examined for inadvertent contribution to the stigmatization process – particularly press conferences and prevention campaigns that reinforce negative stereotypes of gay/bisexual men and PLWH.

Keywords

Stigma, people living with HIV, social norms, homosexuality, Hong Kong

Publication Date

10-2017

Source Publication Title

AIDS Care

Volume

29

Issue

10

Start Page

1255

End Page

1259

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Peer Reviewed

1

Copyright

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in AIDS Care in October 2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09540121.2017.1282601.

Funder

This work was funded by the School of Communication, Hong Kong Baptist University.

DOI

10.1080/09540121.2017.1282601

ISSN (print)

09540121

ISSN (electronic)

13600451

Available for download on Thursday, November 01, 2018

Share

COinS