Document Type

Journal Article

Department/Unit

Department of Communication Studies

Language

English

Abstract

Social media present opportunities and challenges for sexual health communication among young people. This study is one of the first to examine the actual use of Facebook for peer communication of sexual health and intimate relations. Content analysis of 2186 anonymous posts in a “sex secrets” Facebook page unofficially affiliated with a Hong Kong University shows gender balance among posters, inclusiveness of sexual minorities, and frequent sharing of personal experiences in storytelling or advice seeking. The findings illuminate young people’s health concerns regarding condom use, avoiding pain, birth control, sexually transmitted infections, and body appearance. Relational concerns found entailed sexual practices, expectations, and needs—predominantly within dating relationships and include not wanting to have sex. Supportive communication among users was prevalent. A majority of posts involved advice solicitation in the form of request for opinion or information (30.38%), request for advice (13.68%), situation comparison (5.40%), or problem disclosure (9.97%). Comments to the advice-seeking posts were mostly supportive (69.49%); nonsupportive responses (unsolicited messages and gratuitous humor) were concentrated with ambiguous advice solicitations. These findings hold implications for understanding self-disclosure of intimate concerns within social networks, and attuning sexual health intervention on social media to young people’s actual needs and advice preferences.

Keywords

Chinese values, homophobia, social acceptance, discrimination protection, same-sex marriage, Hong Kong

Publication Date

8-2017

Source Publication Title

Journal of Health Communication

Volume

22

Issue

9

Start Page

753

End Page

762

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Peer Reviewed

1

Copyright

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Health Communication on 10/08/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10810730.2017.1347217.

Funder

This work was supported by the Hong Kong Baptist University under a Faculty Research Grant (project code: FRG2/16-17/034).

DOI

10.1080/10810730.2017.1347217

ISSN (print)

10810730

ISSN (electronic)

10870415

Available for download on Friday, March 01, 2019

Included in

Communication Commons

Share

COinS