Document Type

Journal Article

Department/Unit

Department of Communication Studies

Language

English

Abstract

With a survey sample of 208 fulltime employees of organizations in Hong Kong, this study examined whether ingroup membership made a difference in superiors’ use and subordinates’ reactions to influence tactics. Results indicated that ingroup membership exerted impact predominantly on supervisors’ use and subordinates’ perceptions of soft and neutral tactics, but not on hard, negative tactics. Ingroup members, compared to outgroup employees, generally perceived soft, neutral tactics (consistent with group interaction norms) as more appropriate and exhibited greater attitude-behavior consistency in complying with these influence attempts. Supervisors used hard, negative tactics more frequently on outgroup subordinates than on ingroup employees. Ingroup members disliked the anti-normative, negative tactics as much as did the outgroup members. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Keywords

influence tactics, ingroup phenomenon, supervisor-subordinate relationship

Publication Date

3-2012

Source Publication Title

Southern Communication Journal

Volume

77

Issue

2

Start Page

143

End Page

162

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Peer Reviewed

1

DOI

10.1080/1041794X.2011.618520

Link to Publisher's Edition

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1041794X.2011.618520

ISSN (print)

1041794X

ISSN (electronic)

19303203

Included in

Communication Commons

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