Document Type

Journal Article

Authors

Hongxiu Liu, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China
Jiufeng Li
Wei Xia, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China
Bin Zhang
Yang Peng, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China
Yanqiu Zhou
Jing Fang
Hongzhi Zhao
Yangqian Jiang, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China
Wenyu Liu, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China
Xiaojie Sun, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China
Cheng Hu, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China
Zongwei Cai
Shunqing Xu, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China

Language

English

Abstract

Previous studies have proven the endocrine-disrupting properties and health hazards of parabens, triclosan, and benzophenones, but their relationship with blood pressure during pregnancy remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated the associations of repeated measures of urinary parabens, triclosan, and benzophenones with blood pressure during pregnancy and evaluated whether the associations were modified by fetal sex. From a prospective birth cohort in Wuhan, China, we collected urine samples from 644 pregnant women in the first, second, and third trimesters between 2014 and 2015. Five parabens, triclosan, and three benzophenones were quantified in all urine samples. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured in each trimester after urine sampling. Mixed linear models were used to estimate the associations between urinary chemical levels and blood pressure during pregnancy among all pregnant women and subgroups stratified by fetal sex. In the women carrying male fetuses, urinary triclosan and selected benzophenone concentrations were associated with a slight change of SBP during pregnancy. In the women carrying female fetuses, no chemical was associated with SBP, while urinary concentration of triclosan was inversely associated with DBP, though the magnitude was small. Urinary paraben levels weren't associated with blood pressure during pregnancy. Our results suggest that triclosan and selected benzophenone exposure might be associated with blood pressure during pregnancy in a potential fetal sex-different manner. Replicated research studies in pregnant women with higher triclosan and benzophenone exposure levels are needed in the future.

Publication Date

1-2019

Source Publication Title

Environment International

Volume

122

Start Page

185

End Page

192

Publisher

Elsevier

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

DOI

10.1016/j.envint.2018.11.003

Link to Publisher's Edition

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2018.11.003

ISSN (print)

01604120

ISSN (electronic)

18736750

Included in

Chemistry Commons

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