Document Type

Journal Article

Authors

Xiaojie Sun, State Key Laboratory of Environment Health (Incubation), Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (Wuhan), Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei, China
Jiufeng Li, State Key Laboratory of Environmental and Biological Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong
Shuna Jin, State Key Laboratory of Environment Health (Incubation), Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (Wuhan), Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei, China
Wenyu Liu, State Key Laboratory of Environment Health (Incubation), Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (Wuhan), Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei, China
Hongzhi Zhao, State Key Laboratory of Environmental and Biological Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong
Yangqian Jian, State Key Laboratory of Environment Health (Incubation), Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (Wuhan), Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei, China
Hongxiu Liu, State Key Laboratory of Environment Health (Incubation), Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (Wuhan), Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei, China
Wei Xia, State Key Laboratory of Environment Health (Incubation), Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (Wuhan), Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei, China
Zongwei Cai, State Key Laboratory of Environmental and Biological Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong
Shunqing Xu, State Key Laboratory of Environment Health (Incubation), Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (Wuhan), Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei, China
Xiantao Shen, State Key Laboratory of Environment Health (Incubation), Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (Wuhan), Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei, China

Department/Unit

Department of Chemistry

Language

English

Abstract

Background

Previous studies have suggested that phthalates might disrupt fetal steroidogenesis. However, the evidence of the effects of prenatal phthalate exposure across pregnancy on fetal glucocorticoids was insufficient.

Objective

We investigated the associations between urinary phthalate metabolites across pregnancy and cord blood glucocorticoids in a prospective birth cohort.

Methods

Our study included 553 mother-infant pairs from a prospective birth cohort conducted in Wuhan, China. Maternal urine samples were collected at 14, 24 and 36 weeks of gestation (mean). Urinary phthalate metabolites and cord blood glucocorticoids (cortisol and cortisone) were measured. Generalized estimating equation models were conducted to explore the relationships of phthalate metabolite concentrations at each trimester and glucocorticoid levels.

Results

Among the participants, mono‑benzyl phthalate (MBzP) in the first trimester was associated with higher cortisol/cortisone ratio concentrations, and mono‑(2‑ethyl‑5‑carboxypentyl) phthalate (MECPP) and mono‑(2‑ethyl‑5‑oxohexyl) phthalate (MEOHP) measured in the third trimester were associated with decreased cortisone. Moreover, the associations between phthalates and glucocorticoids varied by sex. Among the female infants, each 10-fold increase in several maternal urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations in 1st and 3rd trimester was associated with the increased glucocorticoid levels with percent changes ranged from 16.2%–55.9%. However, among male infants, each 10-fold increase in maternal urinary MECPP, mono‑(2‑ethyl‑5‑hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (MEHHP) and MEOHP in 3rd trimester was associated with 20.8%–36.3% decreased cortisol and cortisone levels, respectively.

Conclusion

We have shown that prenatal phthalate exposure during early and late trimester disrupted the infant steroidogenesis and these associations might be modified by infant sex. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate phthalate exposure at three trimesters during pregnancy in relation to infant glucocorticoids.

Keywords

Phthalate, Glucocorticoid, Prenatal exposure, Trimester-specific

Publication Date

12-2018

Source Publication Title

Environment International

Volume

121

Start Page

471

End Page

479

Publisher

Elsevier

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

DOI

10.1016/j.envint.2018.09.037

Link to Publisher's Edition

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2018.09.037

ISSN (print)

01604120

ISSN (electronic)

18736750

Included in

Chemistry Commons

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