Document Type

Journal Article

Department/Unit

Department of Religion and Philosophy

Language

English

Abstract

In the debates on the roles of cultures in the ethics of human rights, one of them concerns Confucianism and Ubuntu, two prominent cultures in East Asia and Southern Africa, respectively. Some scholars assert that both cultures have values that are sharply different from the West, and conclude that the West should learn from these cultures. The aim of this paper is to philosophically investigate the roles of cultures in the ethics of human rights. I first introduce the works of Bell, Metz and others on community values such as relationships and harmony in Confucianism and Ubuntu. I then argue that even if their interpretations were correct, their works still would not justify the conclusion they want. I show that it is better to use consequential evaluation rather than cultural evaluation to justify human rights. An example of human rights to health and privacy is discussed. This paper thus offers some preliminary but important philosophical investigations and addresses practical issues of consequential evaluation related to human rights.

Keywords

Confucianism, Ubuntu, Cultural Evaluation, Consequential Evaluation, Human Rights, Health, Privacy

Publication Date

1-2019

Source Publication Title

Filosofia Theoretica: Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions

Volume

8

Issue

1

Start Page

162

End Page

181

Publisher

Calabar School of Philosophy, University of Calabar

DOI

10.4314/ft.v8i1.11

Link to Publisher's Edition

https://doi.org/10.4314/ft.v8i1.11

ISSN (print)

22768386

ISSN (electronic)

24085987

Included in

Philosophy Commons

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